css templates

Travel Clinic Glasgow

We provide expert advice, vaccinations and malaria prevention that's tailored to you and your travel plans.

We offer a range of vaccinations and medicines to help ensure your good health, no matter how far and wide you travel.

Our travel vaccination clinic is equipped to offer you expert advice in minimising health risks during and after your holiday or business trips to other parts of the globe. All Vaccines are available onsite, no need to order first!!

International travel doesn’t need to be marred by uncertainty and disease; simply visit our Clinic and get the information you need ahead of time. Wherever you're traveling to, our competitive rates and travel expertise will help to ensure that you're protected from before you leave until you're safely home. We are a registered Yellow Fever Centre.

Our clinic is your essential vaccination guide for traveling abroad, whereby you can rest assured that our travel vaccinations advice supports safe globetrotting.

- Certified Yellow Fever Vaccination centre
- Expert malaria advice
- IMMEDIATE vaccinations
- Up To Date information on worldwide health risks
- Experts in CORPORATE TRAVEL
- FREE travel consultations on purchase of travel vaccinations

What we Vaccinate Against:

Cholera:
Usually transmitted by water contaminated by faeces and shellfish and contaminated food. There is an incubation period of 1-5 days and then onset of rapid diarrhoea, extreme vomiting and dehydration can occur. Travellers living in poor sanitary conditions should avoid using tap water under any circumstances and ensure all food is well cooked and eaten piping hot.

Diptheria, Tetanus and Polio:
Tetanus spores are present in soil contaminated with bird, animal or human faeces and are widely distributed in the environment. Infection is a result of the spores entering a wound at the time of injury. The incubation period is 4-21 days and symptoms include general rigidity and spasms of the skeletal muscles which can be fatal. Polio is contracted from person to person contact through the faecal-oral route (contaminated food and water). Incubation is 7-14 days and with symptoms including fever and mild illness, such as headache and sore throat to flaccid paralysis in rare cases. Minor illness can be followed by remission and severe illness. Diphtheria is contracted though respiratory contact of items soiled by an infected person. Incubation is 2-5 days and it causes a characteristic acute infection of the tonsils, pharynx, larynx or nose.

Hepatitis A:
Transmitted by contaminated water and food, particularly shellfish and person to person contact where hygiene is poor, Incubation is 2-6 weeks with no symptoms and then a sudden onset of mild fever, upset stomach, rash, nausea, vomiting followed by jaundice, at which stage patients begin to feel better.

Hepatitis B:
Transmitted person to person by exposure to bodily fluids (e.g. via occupational exposure, open wounds, sexual contact and newborn infant from mother, contaminated medical, dental and acupuncture instruments, sharing used intra-venous needles and body piercing and tattoo instruments). Infection can be more severe and results in symptoms similar to Hepatitis A with jaundice and hepatitis resulting from liver cell destruction.

Japanese Encephalitis:
It is transmitted to man by the bite of an infected mosquito that normally breeds in rice paddies. The illnesscauses a fever, headache, convulsions, encephalitis and meningitis and especially cranial nerve paralysis. Prolonged recovery and post viral debility are common. Many who recover are left with disabilities. There is no effective anti-viral therapy and treatment is symptomatic.

Malaria:
Transmitted by a mosquito bite, the infected insect releases a parasite into your bloodstream, the parasite then multiplies in the bloodstream. Symptoms are flu like including chills, fever, pain, weakness, muscle aches, abdominal pain, vomiting, cough and diarrhea. Treatable if diagnosed quickly, however it can be fatal.

Meningococcal Meningitis:
Transmitted by person to person via airborne particles. Incubation is 2-10 days with symptoms including a sudden onset of fever, intense nausea, headache, sensitivity to light and vomiting. Other symptoms include a stiff neck and a non-blanching rash.

Rabies:
The disease is transmitted by saliva from a rabid animal through a bite or scratch. Incubation is usually from 5-60 days, but can take much longer. Symptoms include fever, headache, malaise and fatigue. Anxiety depression, agitation and insomnia may also be reported which can develop into hyperactivity, disorientation, hallucination, seizures and bizarre behaviour.

Tick-borne Encephalitis:
Transmitted by the bite of an infected ixodes tick or less commonly, spread by the ingestion of unpasteurised milk for infected animals such as goats. Incubation is 3-14 days. Symptoms can include a flu-like illness that resolves within a few days in the western subtype. The Eastern subtype symptoms includes sudden onset of sever illness including sudden onset of severe headache, fever, nausea and photophobia.

Tuberculosis:

Transmitted through respiratory contact (infected sputum). Infectious patients may be asymptomatic until advanced stages of the disease when symptoms include lethargy, loss of weight, poor appetite, fever, a productive cough and night sweats.

Typhoid:
Transmitted by contaminated water and food, where hygiene is poor and food and drink may be contaminated with human faces or urine. Symptoms include fever, headache, confusion, vague abdominal pain and constipation with red spots occurring on body.

Yellow Fever:
Transmitted by the aedes aegypti mosquito. Two outbreaks types exist: Jungle yellow fever is spread by monkeys and humans become infected in jungle habitat. They in turn can become a source of urban yellow fever outbreaks. Incubation is 3-5 days and the blood remains infected and can be spread by mosquitos biting other humans or monkeys and in turn spreading infection. Symptoms include a sudden onset of fever, backache, generalized muscle pain, prostration, nausea and vomiting. 

Malaria is a tropical disease spread by mosquitoes, which can cause fever, headache and in severe cases, coma or death.
Approximately 1,500 travellers return to the UK with malaria every year.

Countries at risk
Malaria is found in more than 100 countries, mainly in tropical regions of the world, including:

large areas of Africa and Asia
Central and South America
Haiti and the Dominican Republic
parts of the Middle East
some Pacific islands
Malaria is not found in the UK – it may be diagnosed in travellers who return to the UK from risk areas.

The TravelHealthPro website has more information about the risk of malaria in specific countries

Travel precautions
Many cases of malaria can be prevented by the ABCD approach:
Awareness of risk: know your risk of malaria.
Bite prevention: avoid bites as much as possible.
Chemoprophylaxis: take the right antimalarial tablets.
Diagnosis: get immediate medical help for symptoms.

Signs and symptoms
Typical symptoms of malaria include shivering, fever, joint pain, vomiting, jaundice and convulsions. The classic symptom of malaria is a sudden coldness followed by fever and sweating.
In severe cases, malaria can progress extremely rapidly and induce a coma and even death within hours or days.
Young children and pregnant women are especially vulnerable to the disease.

Prevention
If you are travelling to an area with a risk of malaria you may be recommended to take antimalarial tablets to prevent you from becoming infected. Be sure to also use repellent and mosquito nets to increase your level of safety. There are a range of different antimalarial tablets that will be prescribed to travellers based on several factors, including: destination, medical history, family history, current medications, previous problems with anti-malarial tablets, age, and pregnancy.

Being aware of your risk is a huge factor in protecting yourself from the disease, so be sure to speak to one of us while planning your trip.

Which vaccinations will I need?

This depends on your travel destinations.

Be careful to consider all the places you plan to travel as some may be higher risk than others.

Please click here to find out which immunisations you will need.

Travel Clinic Glasgow
Address

Dr Carole McAlister
87 Barrington Drive
Glasgow G4 9ES

Tel: 0141 339 0894
email: info@gpmatters.com

Feedback

Please send us your ideas, suggestions!
Any feedback would be appreciated.
Review us in Google.
Thanks


Private Doctor in Glasgow. We offer the following services: Private GP Clinic, Travel Clinic, OGUK Medicals, Offshore Medicals Glasgow,

Employment Medicals, Sexual Health Screen, HIV testing, Visa Medicals, Vaccines, Underarm Sweating, Head sweating, Migraine treatments.